arctic-tundra

The Arctic is turning green and it’s a bad sign for the future. A new study has confirmed that the vegetation in the Arctic is increasing due to global warming and human activities.

Recently, NASA released a study that says that almost a third of the Arctic Tundra across Alaska and Canada is getting warmer. Now, a new research supports the study, revealing that the Arctic getting greener could be attributed to human activity and greenhouse gas emissions.

The research published in the journal Nature Climate Change conducted a “detection and attribution” study, which involves creating climate models for different events or change, such as the Arctic greening, and see how these events will impact the climate models when mixed with human greenhouse gas emissions.

The results of the simulations showed that the Arctic greening trend can be mainly attributed to “anthropogenic forcings, particularly to rising atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.” The study also notes that even in the areas where there is not much greening, precipitation has been declining as well.

Another reason of the said greening in the Arctic is due to the increase of nitrogen in the atmosphere due to the human use of fertilizers and fossil fuels.

 

Reported by Nature Climate Change

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